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November 19, 2007

Selenium May Help to Prevent Prostate Cancer

According to a federally sponsored study, published by a Stanford University urologist, men with abnormally low levels of Selenium in their blood are four to five times more likely to develop prostate cancer. Selenium is a trace element that is supplied in certain foods and supplements.

The study suggests that making a point of eating Selenium-rich foods, such as Brazil nuts and tuna, or taking a Selenium supplement, may help reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Supplementation is especially useful for older men, as Selenium blood content has been found to decrease with patient age.

Although there are no solid statistics regarding exactly how greatly levels of Selenium in the blood are improved by supplementation, the head researcher of this study, James D. Brooks, MD is decidedly optimistic about the subject. He believes that supplementation has the potential to be of great benefit in preventing prostate cancer, but goes on to comment that more precise research is needed in order to discern exact statistics on the extent of those benefits.

Overall, the researchers who conducted this study believe that they have made some very interesting discoveries, and that increasing levels of Selenium in the blood can significantly reduce a patient's risk of developing the most common form of cancer affecting men.
Jeremy Maddock is the webmaster of
Immune Wellness, your source for high quality information about Selenium and other health products.

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